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Archivo para la categoría ‘Factores Humanos / Psico-Sociolog√≠a’

JetBlue pilot has psychotic episode in prison

Martes, 21 de agosto de 2012 FSI / Curt Lewis Sin comentarios

The JetBlue Airways pilot who disrupted a cross-country flight by leaving the cockpit and ¬†yelling about religion and terrorists has had a psychotic episode in prison and requires further mental evaluation. Clayton Osbon was charged with interference with a flight crew, but was found not guilty by reason of insanity last month. A forensic neuropsychologist testified in a short, unpublicized trial that Osbon had a “brief psychotic disorder” at the time of the flight brought on by lack of sleep…

 

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17th International Symposium on Aviation Psycology

Viernes, 27 de julio de 2012 Estrella Forster Sin comentarios

The International Symposium on Aviation Psychology will be held next May (6-9) 2013.  Hosted by Wright State University & Air Force Research Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate Dayton, Ohio . It is offered for the purposes of : presenting the latest research on human performance problems and opportunities within aviation systems; envisioning design solutions that best utilize human capabilities for creating safe and efficient aviation systems; and bringing together scientists, research sponsors, and operators in an effort to bridge the gap between research and application

 

Proposal Submission deadline: October 5, 2012
Paper Submission deadline: March 1, 2013
Early Registration ends March 15, 2013

** ISAP 2013 / International Symposium on aviation Psycology

A commercial pilot stole plane, committed suicide wanted in connection with murder

Jueves, 19 de julio de 2012 FSI / Curt Lewis Sin comentarios

A commercial pilot wanted in connection with the killing of his girlfriend in Colorado  Springs tried to steal a commercial airplane early Tuesday at the St. George Municipal Airport (Utah), then committed suicide, investigators said. The man who shot and killed himself inside a commandeered SkyWest airplane early Tuesday was 40-year- old Brian Joseph Hedglin, St. George spokesman Mark Mortensen confirmed.
 

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Air France 447 and “The automation Paradox”

Viernes, 13 de julio de 2012 FSI / Curt Lewis Sin comentarios

A deadly combination of pilot confusion, “warning system ergonomics” design and ¬†inadequate pilot training were responsible for the crash of Air France Flight 447 on 1 June 2009.¬†This is the conclusion reached by the BEA (Bureau d’Enqu√™tes et d’Analyses pour la s√©curit√© de l’aviation civile), the French authority responsible for carrying out safety investigations relating to accidents or serious incidents in civil aviation, in its final report into the crash. BEA’s 224-page report indicated that the aircraft might have been flown out of danger if the pilots had realized the situation they were facing.

 

And what this has to do with Automation Paradox?¬† ….

Let’s follow reading this interesting article written by Robert N ¬†Charette in IEEE Spectrum¬† risk analysis blog, featuring daily news, updates and analysis on computing and IT projects, software and systems failures, successes and innovations, security threats, and more

 

 

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“Get-Home-itis”

Lunes, 25 de junio de 2012 Laura Duque Arrubla Sin comentarios

This month, CallBack from NASA`s Aviation Safety Report System takes a look at how the urge to press on to ones`s destination, despite conditions that might otherwise discourage such a decision, can lead to risky behavior and undesirable consequences. Four pilots who let “ge¬ī-home-itis” cloud their thinking share valuable insights into avoiding this dangerous malady.

 

** Get-Home-itis

      CALLBACK / ARS -NASA Issue 389. June 2012

Air traffic controllers aren’t keeping to no-doze schedule

Miércoles, 20 de junio de 2012 Twitter Sin comentarios

New regulations intended to keep air traffic controllers from dozing off on duty have been violated nearly 4,000 times, according to internal Federal Aviation Administration documents. After a controller fell asleep last year in the tower at Reagan National Airport, it emerged that such lapses were commonplace at airports across the country, and the FAA said it would act to curb the problem. There have been repeated violations of a requirement that controllers have at least nine hours off between shifts. Last year instructed the FAA to work with the union on rules to ensure that the controllers who manage 24,000-27,000 commercial flights a day to arrive at work well rested.

 

For reading the whole story at the Washington Post

** Air Traffic Controllers arent’t keeping to no-doze schedule

     Ashley Hasley/ 15-June-2012

Breaking the Mishap Chain

Lunes, 11 de junio de 2012 Pedro Ortiz García Sin comentarios

This book that we recommend is about “Human Factors Lessons Learned from Aerospace ¬†Accidents and Incidents in Research, Flight¬†Test, and Development” .It contains a collection of case studies of mishaps involving experimental aircraft, aerospace vehicles, and spacecraft in which human factors played a significant role. It is offered as a learning tool so that future organizations, programs, and projects may not be destined to repeat the mistakes of the past and is highly advisable for someone devoted to aeromedical field.

 

** Breaking the mishap chain

      By Peter W. Merlin, Gregg A. Bendrick, and Dwight A. Holland

Mental diseases not easy to diagnose

Physicians can’t always identify a pilot’s depression or other mental disorder during an aeromedical exam.Official accident reports atribute just a handful of crashes to a pilot’s deliberate action, citing¬† a psychosomatic¬† disorder, a suicide or some unexplained motive. Here you can read several cases .This article highlights the need of improving pilot-physician relationship in order to detects such problems, as well as some comments about new antidepressant ¬†rules in certain countries.

 

** Difficult Diagnosis

     Linda Welferman / Aerosafety World   May-2012

Human Factors Workshop in Amsterdam

Jueves, 19 de abril de 2012 FSI / Curt Lewis Sin comentarios

Human error is associated with 60 to 80% of all accidents, injuries, and quality defects across a variety of industries including aviation, healthcare, mining and manufacturing. This intensive 2-day seminar provides training in the application of innovative methods for managing human error that are scientifically derived, empirically tested, and proven in the field. Participants will learn how to turn errors into information, information into knowledge, and knowledge into effective error management solutions. The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) was developed by behavioral scientists in the Unites States Navy. This worshop will be the first HFAS in Europe and is going to be conduct by Dr. Shappel and Dr. Wiegmann, recognized names in this field.

 

For seeing venues throughout 2012

** HFAC/ HFX Worshop / Amsterdam-Netherlands 14th & 15th May 2012 

      Please contact       dulmccn@yahoo.com

The “toxic” Captain : How to identify?

Lunes, 16 de abril de 2012 Laura Duque Arrubla Sin comentarios

Shortly after¬†take off from Douala, Cameroon, the pilots of a B737 from Kenya Airlines lost its control . The captain experienced confusion and spatial disorientation and the aircraft entered in an unrecovered spiral dive. Inadecuate operational control, lack of crew coordination and non adherence to standard procedures were among the causes according to Civil Aviation authorities.¬†Research about captain established certain personality traits as “Toxic” Captain capable to make a cockpit environment that can be a safety risk.¬† Let us learn to prevent these behaviors.

Toxic captain:

  • strong character and heightened ego;
  • authoritative and domineering attitude with subordinates;
  • paternalistic attitude;
  • deficiencies in CRM;
  • a ‚Äútouch of arrogance

 

** The Toxic Captain

      Robert I. Baron / Aerosafety World- March 2012